New Year’s Party Invite Website

Design, Invitations, New Piece, Uncategorized, Web Design

SerenoNewYearParty Screen Cap 1

I have another Hype* creation to share. This project was a party invitation where I had the simple task of getting the attendees information about when and where, as well as collect RSVPs from everyone. Click here to see full site.

Firstly, I chose a photo from the Sharon Heights website that I found to be rather appealing (I’m always attracted to the evening/dusk color palette). It also complemented the company’s branding with the warm ochre hues and dark green lawn. Even the blue of the sky was pretty close to the blue that’s in the branding guidelines, and since this was a January party, I thought that it’s cool tones would work best as the main body color.

I wanted the most important info to be prominent: Title, Date, and Time followed in importance by the Location/Directions, then the body text adding description to the event. I wanted it to be easy for visitors to understand where to go to rsvp, add the event to their calendar, and also the option to stay at a nearby hotel that had reserved a block of rooms, so those 3 call-to-actions I made look like buttons in the bottom right of the page.

CalPopUp

While clicking the “Calendar” button would float up 3 options for downloading the event to their calendar of choice (Outlook, Google, and iCal), and the “Stay” button would open in a new tab the custom website that the hotel put together for the attendees to reserve rooms, clicking the “RSVP” button would take the visitor to a second page that has an embedded google form (minimally styled), that they could submit their RSVP. Additionally, clicking on the map image would also take the visitor to the google maps page with proper instructions leading them to the site from their current location.

SerenoNewYearParty Screen Cap 2

The thing that people really loved though, was the snowflakes. This took a little trial and error to get right. Initially I had created the graphic for the static poster image that would go up in the offices, so when it came time to translate to a motion graphic, I had to deconstruct the pattern so that it flowed as an animation.

Snowflakes_Static

This is the base pattern I created on the static image

In order to convert this image into a flowing, seamless pattern, I set up 3 layers of animations: slow, medium, and fast. Pulling apart the original pattern, for the slow animation, the I made a relatively compact version of the design that was only slightly taller than the height of the canvas. Medium was a looser pattern, and approximately 1.5 the height of the canvas. Fast was much looser and about 2x the height.

Snowflakes_How

When pulling those images into Hype, I stacked them on top of each other, and placed their starting and ending points so their bottoms were more or less aligned. Giving them 10 seconds to float down, I left them to be more or less aligned by their top boundaries (after getting them generally aligned this way, I did have to tweak the positioning a bit so that the pattern for each was seamless on the repeat).  Because of the different heights of the original images (which, btw, are transparent pngs), setting them to the same time, the appearance of some snow falling faster than others is achieved.

snow transitions 2

Issues

So the only problem I had with the project was with the embedded google form. Most people were able to submit their RSVP directly on the site, but a few people who used the site on their mobile device were unable to scroll down to click submit. I inserted a work-around by making the rsvp button on the second page a direct link to the proper google form (non-embedded, which google has clearly made mobile friendly), but it was a hack and I would obviously not let that be an issue if I did this again. There is probably a javascript behavior I could implement that would make the form more accessible on mobile, but the easier and simpler option would be to have the form not fall into an iframe – just have the dimension of the original canvas be large enough to hold the form without needing to scroll. Another testament to how important testing on mobile is when designing anything for web nowadays. 

* Just a reminder to anyone who doesn’t know, Hype is basically the HTML5 equivalent to Flash, therefore, the site/animations are visible on iOS devices.

Cookie Party Invite

Cards, Design, Invitations, New Piece, Web Design

CookieParty1

I hosted a cookie party last weekend and made this little interactive website invitation for it. Using Hype again, I made it in 5 “scenes” – an intro (be sure you let the whisk spin!), the invite text, “how it works”, “when and where” with links to add the event to your calendar and directions via google maps, suggestions about what kind of cookie to make (just ideas because I wanted to draw cookies and that seemed like a good excuse), and then the RSVP which if you click the oven mitt, it will email me saying that you’re coming, plus links to the shared google form (don’t want any duplicates), and another source for recipe inspiration.

CookieParty2

I kept the animations to a minimum, but wanted to include a couple hover states like quick twists and little speech bubbles, and also did a roll over using a shape that was transparent. Just playing with some of the fun little features of HMTL5 that add a little extra character to something that might not otherwise have that splash.

Making a(nother) Move

Design

SFMOVE2013

I am moving again (something some friends of mine know too well, as it happens rather too often).

I made my typical “I’ve moved” graphic  (see above), but realized I never did post the little animation I made for when I moved (about this time) last year – my first big step moving from Silicon Valley into San Francisco proper. In fairness, it was designed to be mailed via snail mail, and I was super excited to use my awesome die-cutting machine to cut the intricate “monuments” of SF in card stock, then glue together to make one large fold-out card. I mean, I still could, but time never quite permitted that last year, so I turned the art into a quick HTML5 animation instead (click the image to see it in its full glory). For laziness  continuity, I have kept the same Golden Gate Bridge image in place for both graphics even though neither apartment is near or in sight of the iconic bridge.

Oh well. Here’s to (at least) another year in the beautiful city by the bay.

Print

Agency + Landing Page

New Piece

I recently completed a project that was an animated landing page that I made using Hype. If I haven’t mentioned this program (cough, ahem, I mean App) before, now is as good a time as any. A good friend of mine designed this software to make creating HTML 5 content designer friendly. Sure, not many designers can go into the world nowadays without knowing a little code, but Hype helps not only level the playing field, but also lets designers do what they do best: Design (not code).

So HTML 5 is another medium for animating web pages in the vein of Flash, but utilizing different technologies and using inherent browser capabilities, not plug-ins to function. Yeah, I’m definitely on the band wagon for this new era of rich web content using HTML 5. It’s an exciting time to be experimenting with new technologies and tools.

So saying, I worked as a contractor for another agency (in Belgium, btw; love how small the world is these days) to create this landing page. They were hoping to use a lot of effects, probably to help show off the capabilities of HTML 5, while still maintaining as much cross browser compatibility as possible. Initial designs also utilized google web fonts, which I thought was cool we could do using Hype, but in the end, switched back to a standard web safe font, as it opened up a few more animation options. The techniques I used are opacity changes, movement along paths, rotations, and letter spacing and size changes.