A Mighty Big Harvest Packaging Design

Design, Packaging

As a freelancer, it’s a fun treat when I get the opportunity to bid on a project, win that bid, and then work on that project from concept to completion with a team of other creatives (versus working solo or only on one facet of a campaign’s design).

I presented ideas to Applied Underwriters (a workman’s comp insurance agency (which has a GIANT St. Bernard for a logo)) for their annual wine promotion, an incentive program for sales reps to get more quotes and deals through their company. They have been doing these pretty elaborate direct mail campaigns for a number of years, so have a history of high quality, thoughtful designs under their belt.

The conceptualization process starts out many months in advance of when the program starts (technically, I think they are already thinking about the next year’s as soon as the program is just finishing up for the current year). I was given an overview of what the mandatory requirements for the promotion were, samples of things they’ve done in the past, and a brief idea of what “might be cool” this year. Amusingly, the initial concept was about pairing wine with chocolate, which is the concept I presented for, and then won the bid for, but as so many things go, issues with that concept arose afterwards, and we all had to then pivot and create a new concept after a few weeks worth of work had already gone into plan A.

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My pitch for chocolate/wine pairing

Unfortunately, this promotion would be mailed out in August, which for most of the non-fog-bound-San Francisco parts of the country means melty times for chocolate.

But that’s ok, we played with a few other ideas but then eventually moved on to a concept of sending custom Govino glasses (those plastic ones with the little notch for your thumb) for the first mailer, and then a wine tasting game for the second mailer (basically, magnet poetry for your wine). Because it’s fun to look back on how things evolved, here are 2 of the very initial sketches for both of those pieces.

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Initial box design

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Magnet Poetry meets wine tasting design idea

Over the course of a couple more months, we refined, rewrote, reimagined, and then finally designed the 2 final pieces. I worked with the team up until almost the very end when their in-house design team took my files and cleaned them up for print production. A few more changes were made that likely were the result of seeing in-person mock ups and working out issues or cleaning up the design (like the outside of the box was supposed to be a scene from Napa, but I think it must have been a technical nightmare to line up AND looked very busy compared to the toned down, no image option they ran with for the final).

Fun to have played a big part in that process and guided the overall design work, and then see the final product turn out so well. A very great experience! Shout out to a very great art director and creative writer who were both so thoughtful and detail oriented throughout the whole process. It’s always a pleasure to work with such smart people. Also, a shout out to the highly technically scratchboard illustrator, Steven Noble, whom they have been working with for ages, for his contributions to the piece.

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box open with reward chart insert removed

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reward chart

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Second Mailer in its plastic mailing sleeve

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Family Greetings in Retro Travel Postcard Style

Design, Illustration

Day Care Project final web

I worked on a project recently that was a lot of fun. A mother whose child attends a small daycare center wanted to pull together a unique thank you gift for the class’s teachers. She found a board she really liked on Etsy, and thought it would be fun to have pictures of the families to pin onto it. We got to talking and the idea expanded to be not just family photos, but vintage inspired travel postcard themed cards with a greeting of their choice on it. Each family had a fun story or background that we could highlight, so I whipped up a textured template (working with a limited palette that went well with the board she’d found) and I made a bunch of fun graphics to include on each family’s card. I also aged the photos a bit to make them fit in with the retro style a bit more.

Day Care Photos Lutz

Father came from Hawaii, and they love to surf!

They love to be outdoors, especially their garden.

They love to be outdoors, especially their garden.

Mom is from Trinidad and Father is from Norway, so they can never decide between skiing and surfing.

Mom is from Trinidad and Father is from Norway, so they can never decide between skiing and surfing.

Parents are from Taiwan and New Jersey - their love met in the middle. Can't forget the dog!

Parents are from Taiwan and New Jersey – their love met in the middle. They love biking and hiking, too.

All their love, from Switzerland.

All their love, from Switzerland.

We have a rivalry on our hands! Also, can't forget the dog.

We have a rivalry on our hands! Also, can’t forget the dog.

Both parents are basically professional dancers, both ballroom and swing.

Both parents are basically professional dancers, both ballroom and swing.

Can't forget the Frozen fans. (image blurred by family's request).

Can’t forget the Frozen fans. (image blurred by family’s request).

A very fun, personalized gift for the teachers. They loved it so much they plan on keeping it in the classroom even after the current class has moved on.

It was a lot of fun coming up with graphics for each family and having it work with the theme. I liked the color palette a lot, too. Would be fun to make more graphics like this.

Oh, here’s the backside, where the family’s wrote their personalized messages. Complete with custom stamp and post office marker.

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Measles Comeback

Design, Illustration, infographic

In light of recent measles news, I decided to make a little PSA regarding the history of measles, including the reasons why it seems to have made a comeback in the U.S.

I happily used the article Matt Pearce of the LA Times wrote last week as my guide. In fact, I recommend reading it in full if you’re interested in some of the extra details he writes that I didn’t have room to include here.

San Francisco Infographic – 59 Illustrated Facts

Design, Illustration, infographic

PrintI’m so pleased to have a new piece featured in the Bold Italic today. I worked on this for a few months so am excited it gets to see the light. For those not local to San Francisco, the Bold Italic is a popular local website that is both a treasure trove of resources about things in and around the city, but also full of fun illustrated articles that hit home for a lot of San Franciscans. What better place to showcase a fun infographic about tid-bits of city trivia?

PrintI dug deep into the depths of the internet to find facts that I felt were static, meaning not info about population, demographics, economy, or other such things that change frequently, in order to give this piece a longer shelf life.

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It was a lot of fun to discover some of these things too, so hopefully the readers enjoy learning along with me. I mean, what city has two songs dedicated to its honor. The story behind why there is an official song AND a ballad is so good it almost deserves an illustration of its own. Perhaps I’ll save it for another time.

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My hope is that the internet has not lied to me in my effort to find factual information. If anyone has anything to contest, I’d be eager to hear your findings.

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For example, I almost misrepresented Mission Dolores as the oldest structure, but luckily a good friend of mine came across an article debunking some common held SF misconceptions, saving me from publishing that error. Still felt like I had to include the Mission though as it’s such an iconic and clearly very old piece of SF history.

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In the spirit of infographics, I did also try to keep things like scale consistent wherever possible. There are some places where that didn’t work out, and others where I felt it was too important to skip (the magnitude of the earthquakes, for example, since it really adds to the viewers’ understanding of the difference in severity), and I do feel rather guilty about failing to represent the information. Hopefully you don’t hold it against me too much.

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I was pretty pleased to learn about the history of Wells Fargo and its relationship to American Express. History fun facts are cool.

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Hope you enjoy! Keep an eye out for more. I had so much fun making this, I can’t wait to come up with another.

Change of Address & Personal Branding Project

Branding, Design, Illustration

Anita Branding 2

I worked on a personal branding project for a client who made a move from Seattle to Monterey. I worked up a change of address card showing the move from “the Space Needle to the Cypress Needles” and worked in an illustration of one of my favorite trees here in California, the Monterey Cypress, using a California Craftsman style, with the warm earth tones, art nouveau inspired curves, and outlined shapes. I wanted the overall shape of the tree to parody the shape of the space needle, as I had originally thought a 2 sided mailer would look neat if they lined up, but changed the plan when I decided to make it a postcard instead of a stuffed mailer. The shapes are still similar, but I relaxed the curves of the tree which I think worked out much better in the long run. Print

Knowing my client loves the color cobalt blue, I worked that in to the overall branding, including envelopes, which I think will really pop when compared to other mail. I included a design for a regular natural colored envelope as well, matching the paper used for the letterhead, and printed a blue bordered version of her branding directly on the envelope.

Anita Branding 1

Redwood Canyon, Kings Canyon National Park

photography

Just a few pics I got from a day hike in Kings Canyon this April. Nature is a pretty place. I love the tall trees, the red bark, the mossy rocks and tree trunks, the fungus that look like they belong in the shire, and upturned tree trunks whose scraggly roots are exposed, still housing the rocks and earth they once grew around. We also ventured into an area where a controlled burn had gotten out of hand a few years back, leaving the landscape a little surreal in its wake.

WooCamp 2014 Invite – Parallax Website

Design, Illustration, Invitations, photography, Web Design

WooCamp2014 Header w Background

I did it! I’ve made a parallax site. For anyone who hasn’t noticed, parallax has exploded in the last year (or less?). It is such a wonderful way to create layers, animation, and add a sense of depth to a web experience. I have just barely touched the tip of the iceberg with what I’ve created here – the potential to add even more transitions and animations to a parallax site are boundless.

I was excited to experiment with this new technology with my long-standing client, that being the annual WooCamp invite. I’ve created 4 of them so far, alternating between print and web based invites. The event lends itself to themes of adventure, exploration, wilderness, and camaraderie, and this year, inspired also by my client’s recent trips to Antarctica, Patagonia, Everest, K2 (the list goes on), I settled on “Victorian Adventurer” for the invite’s theme. (Previous incarnations have been National Parks, Wild West, and something akin to Summer Camp).

I started with some fancy Victorian lettering, pulling inspiration from a Pinterest board I created that is full of Victorian/Explorer images. I also not-so-secretly admire Jessica Hische and all her beautiful lettering projects, and wanted to take a stab at one myself, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity. I also created a “ticket” that could be used for email, directing invitees to the website, which was another Victorian travel inspired piece.

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In addition to some fun side graphics I created that illustrated the events of the weekend, I had to include in there somewhere an homage to the phrase, “Livingstone, I presume.” I mean, I had to.

Portrait Template

My first iteration of the Livingstone portrait – I took my client’s face and photoshopped it into a portrait of Henry Morgan. I thought initially I might be able to make little Livingstone-esque portraits for all the attendees as part of their invitation, but realized I simply didn’t have enough time to do that.

Drawing inspiration once again from my Victorian source material, I wanted to include images or maps of the area. The beautiful botanical drawings that came from that era have such a wonderful tone and saturation about them that I wanted to emulate. Tempted initially to bust out water colors and paint up some background images, I instead came across a wealth of photos I had taken while I was at WooCamp one year. Taken when the sun was setting, the colors were ripe and with a few tweaks and filters I feel like I captured the essence of the place, while also playing along with the theme I had established, and created images that had a painted quality about them.

So the background parallax effect I borrowed the general look from this site tutorial. But I really wanted the background images to move slightly, so had to add that code in. Additionally, I wanted to include some more graphics that could tie into the “what to do/what to bring” section, so created another animation speed for those objects so they would appear to “fly up” the screen at a faster rate than the regular scroll. Kind of like how things scroll up the sides of a Pixar animations credits.

WooCamp2014-Screen-Cap

Here’s a little animated gif of the animation speeds. Probably better to just look at the site though, so you can scroll at your own pace (here’s the site).

The potatoes are my favorite.